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  Greater London Cradles is proud to announce that we have applied and been accepted as a member of the suspended access industry authority, 'SAEMA'. This will help clarify GLC’s voice concerning the changing shape of Health and Safety in the suspended access industry. The only trade association dedicated to this specialist sector, 'SAEMA' is committed to advancing safety, standards and best practice in the temporary and permanent suspended access industry. Its member companies provide safe places of work for those tradesmen involved in working at height to install and maintain façades. Click here to read more about 'SAEMA'.
Tuesday, 19 July 2016

GLC News

The reason for safety procedures: 7 examples of why they are important Health and safety procedures, whilst at times seeming excessive and tedious, are extremely important to modern day businesses. Safety procedure are put in place to keep employees and customers safe within the workplace, and by extension, protect the company from liability claims. Here are 7 reasons why health and safety regulations are important to both employers and employees: 1. Reduce personal injuries Safety procedures are primarily in place to prevent accidents. They cover everything from ensuring wet floor signs are put out, to guidelines for the correct use of machinery. Because companies with high accident records are considered an high risk by insurance companies, having comprehensive safety procedures in place can save a business money.   2. Less damage to company property Correct usage of machinery and equipment is set out by thorough safety procedures. Having your employees use your equipment in the right way will prevent damage and again, save the business money. Line managers are very important in their role with regards to this matter. They should be enforcing correct usage policies and procedures   3.Protection from liability If a staff member or customer is injured on your premises then your business can be held accountable. Legal proceedings can be very costly. A smaller business may not be able to withstand a large legal case, and may be closed by such expenses.   4.Gain certification Certifications are a seal of approval from a third party which confirm that your business is all above board and run according to health and safety guidelines. Becoming certified could even translate to further savings on liability insurance.   5.Maintain certification Making the effort to get your company certified is worthless if standards drop the day after the certificate is awarded. Proper safety procedures, implemented and maintained will ensure that you don’t lose your certification on inspection day.   6.Improve efficiency A common effect of implementing safety procedures is an increase in productivity. When reviewing your business in order to implement these procedures will allow you to take an objective look at operations and find more efficient/effective ways of working. The speed at which your employees work will be increased by having them all adhering to the same guidelines.   7.Improve staff morale Having your staff know that their company cares about their safety will improve staff morale. If your staff know they will not be put into any dangerous situations at work their output will increase.     Related articles Can Improving the 'Safety Culture' of a Company Really Reduce Accidents in the Workplace? (prweb.com) The law, sentencing and managerial attitudes (amalgamatesafety.wordpress.com) The Importance Of Safety Training San Angelo To All (larrydkeen.com) Core Safety Product Checklist - Business Essentials. (staples.com) Railway worker who rescued woman in wheelchair who fell onto the tracks minutes before train arrived is suspended for breaching 'safety procedures' (thisismoney.co.uk) Railway worker who rescued woman in wheelchair who fell onto the tracks minutes before train arrived is suspended for breaching 'safety procedures' (dailymail.co.uk)
Friday, 06 September 2013

Industry News

The rise in GDP in the third quarter masked a fall in construction. Photograph: Roger Bamber/Alamy Building firms are usually the first into a recession and the fastest out of the blocks when confidence returns. With a lift in confidence comes a return to soaring land values, something that spurs them to unwrap mothballed cranes and mix up the cement. Not in this recession. The absence of business and household confidence has dampened demand. Making matters worse for this most cyclical of industries, the Bank of England's low interest rate policy has prevented the usual dramatic fall in house prices during the crash and consequent upswing when the worst of the recession is over. A lack of mortgages and commercial loans from lending institutions is also a prominent feature of the post-recession scene. In response, builders have kept under lock and key their massive landbanks of sites ripe for development. The Office for National Statistics found construction industry output shrank 4% in the year to the end of September and 0.6% on the previous quarter. Construction accounts for 7.2% of the economy and in the past has provided a strong impetus for growth out of recession. Some analysts have argued the survey of construction by the ONS has underplayed its recovery, others say growth remains depressed and only clocked up positive figures last year as building on the Olympics site and London's tallest building, the Shard, fed into the figures. Whichever way the figures add up, it's not a positive result. The same can be said of manufacturing, which was supposed to lead the country out of recession as part of a re-balancing away from sectors like construction. However, manufacturing was subdued and extra spending on gas and electricity following huge energy price hikes accounted for most of the growth in "production industries". One-off factors also played a part in the ONS asking analysts to take overall figures for the second quarter of the year and the third together to get a more rounded picture of the economy's health. The royal wedding and Japanese tsunami played havoc with official data in the spring and contributed to the exceptionally low 0.1% growth figure in the second three months of 2011. Taken together with the 0.5% in the third quarter, growth averaged 0.3% in each of the last two quarters, half the 0.6% per quarter clocked up by the UK economy in previous recoveries. Looking back over the full year, the ONS says growth was 0.5%, or 0.125% in each quarter, which is likely to be the weakest of any eurozone country except Greece and well below US growth of 2.5%. Unlike the US, where manufacturing production and business investment are prominent, the UK was saved from sinking back into recession by the banking industry, telecoms, computing and government spending. A look at the banking sector shows it had nowhere to go but up after sinking to the point of near bankruptcy in the crash. Profits at Barclays were up in the first nine months of the year. HSBC, with its largely foreign revenues, should also see profits up this year. Yet the next year is expected to be less rosy, especially for state-owned Lloyds and Royal Bank of Scotland, with the euro crisis persisting and lending still low. The supertanker that is Whitehall has continued sailing straight ahead, at least when it concerns spending on health and education, with a rise of 0.5% on the previous quarter, but spending is expected to turn south within the next year as harsher cuts take effect. Which leaves telecoms and computing to offset retrenchment in other sectors. Can the UK build growth on a desire to own a tablet computer or smartphone? It will take more than that. Original author: Phillip Inman
Friday, 26 July 2013

Industry News

An increase in house building could be on the cards in certain areas, thanks to new legislation being brought into force by the government that will give social tenants the power to boost house building in their area. Right to Transfer, which is coming into force in the autumn, will mean that tenants can take control over future investment into their communities by requesting new homes to be built. The plans will work alongside the £19.5bn public and private investment to build 170,000 affordable homes by 2015, and plans in the Spending Review to invest £3.3bn to deliver 165,000 affordable homes over 3 years from 2015 – equivalent to the fastest annual rate of housebuilding for 20 years. As part of the deal, housing associations will need to show plans in place that will lead to the building of new affordable homes and the improvement of existing stock. Housing minister Mark Prisk said: “Combined with the multi-billion pound investment we’re making, these steps will help ensure we reach the fastest annual rate of housebuilding for two decades, delivering the affordable homes this country needs, and putting real power into the hands of local people who live in them.” The new rights will also let social tenants who want to see their homes owned, managed and maintained by a housing association rather than a council, request for a change of ownership.
Friday, 26 July 2013

Industry News

From September 2015 Greater London Cradles has moved premises from 186 Empire Road, Perivale to Vanguard Business Centre, Alperton Lane, Perivale, Middlesex, UB6 8AA. Not a big move in distance but a giant leap in terms of facilities.   Please use this address for all future correspondence and please be patient with any glitches that may arise due to the relocation of address.   Click here to see our new address on google maps   Thanks from the GLC team.
Wednesday, 11 November 2015

GLC News